The SANDBOX 
                Issue #67    June 17, 2000
        Ideas - Opinion - Personal Experience

                  SANDBOX Archive Site:
          http://THE.SANDBOX.tripod.com

     "The student consumer at Col-Hi suffers as
 the spring months approach, while there is a
 boost in the drug store economy in Richland due
 to the increased purchase of deodorant and
 No-Doz."

               - Senior Sandstorm, 1976

                            ~ ~ ~~

Look Who's Talking Today!

     "I have to ask the obvious question. Are all
 those people who wanted open trade with China
 now going to demand the same vis-a-vis Cuba?
 The claim is that trade will further democracy
 and human rights for the Chinese; sounds like a
 pretty strong argument to immediately end the
 embargo on Cuba, eh what?"

                        -Jim Rice '75

     "Those of us who grew up "pre TV" look with
 disdain on the younger generations who have
 lived with TV from birth. The TV isn't the problem
 - we are. For we have discovered that it is easier
 to either completely denounce TV or to give
 control of lives over to it. TV is a tool that we
 need to use, just like books, newspapers and
 radio. What's more, we need to teach others that
 there are many forms of information
 dissemination, and the easiest isn't always the
 best."

                        - Jay Siegel '61

     "... why ... is [Imperial retirement of lawmakers]
 not an issue with the electorate?... in the Q & A
 sessions for every Federal candidate for office, 
 including GW and Algore, this issue should be raised." 

                      - Steve Carson '58

     "Who would now like to calculate the
 probability that, had Bill Gates decided to pony
 up to the Democratic National Committee in a
 fashion commensurate with being the richest man
 in the world, his Microsoft Corporation would
 still be the target of federal anti-trust prosecution?"

                         - John Allen '66

     "If our illustrious 'congress persons' were
 made to pay social security from their salaries as
 representatives of the people, and their retirement
 "bennies" were paid from social security; then they
would not have a toy to scare
 the represented with.  Just how many times in the
 past fifteen or twenty years have we heard that
 the social security system is going bust?
 Especially around election time."

    - Robert Carlson (aka "Mike Clowes") '54

                            ~ ~ ~ ~ ~  


The Sandbox, Issue #67, Salutes The Class of '67  
To get to the '67 Home Page, go to:
    All-Bomber-Links-
    http://www.bigfoot.com/~RichlandBombers
    When you click on 1967, you will find:

 Reunions - Sports - Pictures from All Grades
 And articles, (such as excerpted here), from 
 the 1967 Senior Sandstorm.

Subj: The Class of '67 Is Hot!
From: The 1967 Senior Sandstorm

The student consumer at Col-Hi suffers as the
 spring months approach, while there is a boost in
 the drug store economy in Richland due to the
 increased purchase of deodorant and No-Doz.

...there is no air conditioning in the new wing. 
 With the increased use of ... "pit stoppers,"
 [deodorant] an air conditioning system was not
 installed when the building was constructed.

According to Mr. Lyda, Assistant Principal,
 "Classroom space was given ... priority over air
 conditioning... because without rooms it would
 be impossible to have school.  Air conditioning
 can be put in easily [later] because installation of
 mechanical equipment has allowed for it." ...

... What Col-Hi needs is an "Air Conditioning
 Booster Club" that could produce $40,000 in the
 next three or four years for the necessary coolant.

                  - 1967 Senior Sandstorm

                       ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~

   Here's More of 
                What We're Talking About Today!

Subj: Cuba
From: Jim Rice '75
From: jrice@sojourners.com

I think Brad Upton's right-on-the-mark about
 what's going to happen to Cuba.  In fact, it's
 already happening. A friend just came back from
 a five-month stay in Cuba, and she said that
 there's already a huge gap between the "tourist
 Cuba" (mainly for Europeans, but oh-so-ready
 for those American dollars) and the rest of the
 island. "Regular" Cubans aren't allowed in the
 luxury hotels or even on the tourist beaches.
 They can't ride in the "tourist" cabs, or shop at
 the special tourist stores. As Brad says, that
 situation will multiply when the sunny Cuban
 beaches are opened to vacationing Americans.
 Whether that will be better for the average
 Cuban is somewhat doubtful.

And speaking of Cuba, I have to ask the obvious
 question. Are all those people who wanted open
 trade with China now going to demand the same
 vis-a-vis Cuba? The claim is that trade will
 further democracy and human rights for the
 Chinese; sounds like a pretty strong argument to
 immediately end the embargo on Cuba, eh what?

                       -Jim Rice ''75

                             ~ ~ ~

Subj:   Misdirected Anger!
From:  Jay Siegel (61)
jazfuchsias@prodigy.net

No matter what you think of President Clinton as
 a person, he is the designated Head of State for
 the United States of America. Throughout his
 political career he has made his decisions on
 "what is good for Bill Clinton." If it was
 politically expedient, it was right, if it was not to
 his advantage it was wrong. His political
 appointments largely followed how many votes
 that the individual could provide. I have
 acquaintances in Alabama who still refer to him
 as "Wiley Willie."

The portrait that he has sent to the rest of the
 world, in general, is one that shows a lack of
 integrity and a strong tendency to distort motive.
 He is very good at that.

In his defense, our Nations moral ethic has
 changed such that his performance is acceptable.
 Good or bad, that is the bottom line. The reasons
 are many, but all boil down to communications.
 Several post graduate thesis can and have been
 written about the subject but it comes down to
 everyone can see, hear and interact with what is
 going on. If you like or dislike something, you
 can find someone to agree with you. It is very
 difficult to take the tack of "I believe this way,
 but I will listen to opposition and am willing to
 be proven wrong." That is admitting that one is
 a) fallible and b) human.

The reason for all of this? What ever the
 question, put aside your own thoughts and seek
 others; others that both agree and disagree.
 Listen to what they are saying and be willing to
 change if the facts warrant.

Brad, your letter echoes the doctrine that put
 Castro into the palace in Cuba. Cuba is a country
 of essentially two industries - agriculture and
 tourism. Small unit agriculture is on the low end
 of the income generating scale: a large number of
 people generating a small amount of income.
 Tourism, on the other hand, is on the high end of
 the scale with a few people generating a large
 amount of income. What you pointed out as a
 shortcoming, the low skill level support people,
 are actually the means of adjusting the
 agricultural household income upward.

The other part of the problem is the Ugly
 American syndrome that isn't a part of income,
 politics or anything more complicated than
 closed mindedness. I have seen it all over the
 world, in countries like Cuba and in more
 advanced countries. We, as a people, have had it
 good and, again as a people, think that it was
 because of our individual efforts that we are this
 way.

Those of us who grew up "pre TV" look with
 disdain on the younger generations who have
 lived with TV from birth. The TV isn't the problem
 - we are. For we have discovered that it is easier
 to either completely denounce TV or to give
 control of lives over to it. TV is a tool that we
 need to use, just like books, newspapers and
 radio. What's more, we need to teach others that
 there are many forms of information
 dissemination, and the easiest isn't always the
 best.

I spend, an average of 2 hours a day in front of a
 monitor, writing, working on webpages, working
 on data bases and doing research. I have made it
 a practice to take the top headlines, go to a
 couple of search engines and see what others are
 saying about subject - not only in the media or in
 the USA, but all over the world. Once you get
 out of the "air conditioned and directed"
 environment of the "media," it is amazing what
 we aren't being told.

For your info Gus, a good portion of the world
 felt that "We the People" are really jerks for
 giving into the "Tree-huggers."

With election year here, start getting away from
 the media and find out some of the other points
 of view towards candidates - remember, We
 elect (either directly or indirectly) those who
 make the decisions!

                       - Jay Siegel (61)

                               ~ ~ ~

Subj: Electorate Not Concerned Enough About
 The Percs Their Elected Representatives Endow
 Upon Themselves.
From:   Steve Carson (58)
SteveNitro@aol.com

Imperial Retirement:

Good discussion and what I don't understand is,
 why this is not an issue with the electorate?  The
 White House Sex story should be small
 potato(e)s to this and in the Q & A sessions for
 every Federal candidate for office, including GW
 and Algore, this issue should be raised.  

                    - Steve Carson (58)

                               ~ ~ ~

Subj:   More "PROBABILITY"
From: - John Allen '66
Reply-to: miles2go@cheerful.com

June 13th, 2000

Who would now like to calculate the probability
 that, had Bill Gates decided to pony up to the
 Democratic National Committee in a fashion
 commensurate with being the richest man in the
 world, his Microsoft Corporation would still be
 the target of federal anti-trust prosecution? 
 After all, if you contribute like Bernie Schwartz,
 CEO of Silicon Valley's Loral Corporation, you
 not only don't have the Clinton Department of
 Injustice (DOI) or the IRS on your back, you can
 pretty much be assured it is also OK to sell
 highly classified missile guidance technology to
 the Communist Chinese.  (Has anyone heard
 from under the rug about that case lately?  Of
 course not; today's front page story is, AGAIN,
 missing nuclear secrets from the Los Alamos
 weapons labs. Tomorrow it'll be yet another top
 secret laptop computer missing from the innermost
 sanctum of the State Department. What a guy, our 
 Bill!!  He really has things under control.)

Considering the Administration's full court press
 on Microsoft, gun manufacturers, and cigarette
 companies, the American Trial Lawyers 
Association is certainly one organization which
 has not been short-changed by the Clintons.  Just
 today, VISA and MasterCard are being added to
 the ever expanding list of DOI prosecutions. 
 American business is rapidly becoming a "target
 rich environment."  After all, it is not just a few
 lawyers from the Federal Government who are
 involved in the proceedings; it is also the hordes
 of lawyers working for, or consulting with, the
 many State Attorneys General who have joined
 the Feds in these prosecutions.  Add to that the
 legions of legal eagles for the many corporations
 being sued or prosecuted and it is difficult to
 see that the lawyers are NOT the only ones
 benefiting.  Whether as a taxpayer or a customer,
 you and I are paying their freight and these cases
 have already become some pretty long hauls. 
 Please understand, I make these observations
 without regard to whomever should or should
 not be prosecuted.  That's a wholly different
 subject which deserves future attention.  Rather I
 am suggesting motives other than "Justice" for
 these prosecutions, and trying to shed additional
 light on the power of money in the political
 process; especially where a corrupt president
 with willing accomplices is in charge.  Can
 anyone cite a big money contributor to the DNC
 who has also suffered through an IRS fishing
 expedition, a DOI prosecution, or who has even
 been deprived of his night in the Lincoln
 Bedroom?  And how are your IRAs and 401K
 Plans doing since Microsoft took that 49%
 plunge?

                - John Allen (Class of '66)

                               ~ ~ ~

Subj: Social Security and Retirement
From:   Robert Carlson (aka "Mike Clowes") '54
karylc@juno.com 

Re:  Mary Ray Henslee's ('61) comments on 
  Social Security

Let me preface my remarks by stating that I am
 what is known as a "double-dipper" when it
 comes to retirement money.  I receive military
 retirement for serving over 29 years both active
 and reserve, and I receive railroad retirement
 following 21 years of service there (plus a nice
 parting gift).

That being said, I did not contribute any more
 than my life and my time towards military
 retirement; the retirement being one of those
 things we referred to as "bennies."  I did,
 however have deductions made from my
 pay check toward railroad retirement, so there I
 have a vested interest.

Railroad retirement and social security are run by
 federal agencies, and as such are subject to
 monumental tamperings by our esteemed
 "congress persons."  I do get some social
 security, but it is a part of railroad retirement.  I
 couldn't get both; besides railroad retirement
 pays better.  A minor portion of railroad
 retirement is taxable, and, naturally, military
 retirement is taxed.

If our illustrious "congress persons" were made
 to pay social security from their salaries as
 representatives of the people, and their
 retirement "bennies" were paid from social
 security; then they would not have a toy to scare
 the represented with.  Just how many times in the
 past fifteen or twenty years have we heard that
 the social security system is going bust?
 Especially around election time.

No, Mary, there is no sanity clause when it comes
 to the Congress and Social Security.  And it
 makes no difference if the "congress person" is
 Republican or Democrat.  They both want their
 fingers in the cookie jar. Mainly, so they can tell
 us, the voters and represented, that they are
 striving diligently to preserve the Social Security
 system, and also remind us that it was not meant
 to be a retirement income.  "That's what your
 pension plan is for."  Who cares if the
 organization that was taking care of your
 pension fund went bust, or was absorbed by
 some bigger money vacuum.

     - Robert Carlson (aka "Mike Clowes") '54

                              ~ ~ ~

In a message dated 6/15/2000 9:15:38 AM Pacific 
Daylight Time, asking@worldnet.att.net writes:

<< 
 WOW!!  What a promotion for the '66 web site. 
 Thanks, Al!  Just curious, though, who paid you? 
 Ahh ... I just noticed that there is a page number
 of "-66-" on this issue of The Sandbox.  Perhaps
 that is my clue??  *GRIN*
 
 Peace,
 Shirley Collings Haskins, '66 Webmaster

DearShirley,

Perhaps you noticed also, that this was Issue #66
 of The SANDBOX?  I like to salute each class
 whose numbered year corresponds with the 
current SANDBOX Issue Number and "sign off" 
 with that number when the issue is complete. 
 Issue #67 of The SANDBOX will honor the
 class of 67 and so on and so on. Ending each
 issue with -66- OR -67-, etc., is a "play" on
 the traditional practice of reporters indicating to
 their editors and "type setters" that a piece of
 copy is complete by placing a "-30-" at the end.  
 I enjoy substituting the current issue number for
 the traditional -30- to signify and celebrate the
 fact that "the copy is complete."

Sorry I didn't see your name on the front page of
 your very fine -66- web site, Shirley. I would
 have been happy to give you credit for your hard
 work!

-Al Parker

Thanks for your Interest and Entries, everyone.  
 You may send your Ideas, Opinions and Personal
 Experience to The_Sandbox@Bigfoot.com, or
 simply press the Reply button in you mailbox and
 talk to us!

                                - ap

                               -67-